Date: April 1st, 2011 | Comments : none | Categories: Anoles, Dallas, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Spring, Texas, USA.

Anole Season
Anole Season

 

Date: March 20th, 2011 | Comments : none | Categories: Cultures, Environmental issues, issues, Reptiles, Seasonal, Series, Spring, Texas, Travel, Travel USA, Unusual Interest, USA.

Children watch on as snake-wranglers demonstrate - fangs have broken balloons, laying on the ground hereLeft: Children watch on as snake-wranglers demonstrate various tricks goading the rattlesnakes. Fangs have broken the balloons, foreground, during demonstrations at the annual Rattlesnake Roundup in Sweetwater, Texas. The Texan cultural tradition, both horrifying and curiously fascinating, takes place during Springtime every March, when thousands of rattlesnakes are competitively captured each year and placed in pits inside the local arena, with wrangling demonstrations, milking, skinning, tables of bizarre crafts, the sale of deep-fried rattlesnake, and even a meat-eating contest involving Miss Roundup’s participation. Next photo: Individuality – each snake has its own unique markings and colors.

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Individuality - each snake has unique skin color and patternsNow that we have moved from Texas, and may never live there again, I’m so glad we went. View more photos posted on March 15th 2009, the initial post of Rattlesnake Roundup in Sweetwater TX.

 

Date: November 9th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Anoles, Autumn, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Smile, Texas, USA.

Green Anole, Lewisville TX

 

Date: October 14th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Autumn, Dallas, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Texas, turtles.

Painted Turtle, Lewisville, TexasAll the  recent rain in Lewisville (Texas) has washed out a few reptiles into our neighborhood from the nearby canal…a Painted Turtle showed up by a neighbor’s garage and was the center of attention for a few hours until it was brought back to the canal area. The same neighbor found a snake in their garage earlier last week. Judging from their description it may have been a non-venomous Rough Green Snake.

 

Date: August 11th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Anoles, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Series, Summer, Texas.

Anole on the lawn chair… another Green Anole photo … birds are lingering around the back yard more this year, so it’s good to see the Anoles are still thriving.

 

Date: August 8th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, conservation, Dallas, Dallas World Aquarium, Reptiles, Texas, Trees.

Iguana, Dallas World Aquarium

 

Date: June 16th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Summer, Texas.

Salamander Egg, Lewisville, TexasGreat garden find! I knew this was a Salamander egg inside a warm, cozy half-buried clay pot because the parent scurried away just seconds before. I would not have disturbed it but was pulling weeds and tidying up that area of the garden. It was carefully put back inside, protected with leaves and grass clippings. If Salamanders are anything like Anoles, they lay eggs and do not return to care for them, so I don’t think handling will make a difference on whether it hatches or not.

 

Date: May 22nd, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Anoles, Garden, Reptiles, Summer, Texas, USA.

Anole on the side of our house, Lewisville, TX

 

Date: April 19th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Anoles, Garden, Green, Reptiles, Seasonal, Series, Texas.

Green Anole in our back yardGreen Anole in our back yardGreen Anole in our back yard

Green Anole in our back yardGreen Anole in our back yardGreen Anole in our back yard

 

Date: March 15th, 2009 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, conservation, Cultures, Historic significance, issues, Reptiles, Seasonal, Series, Spring, Texas, Travel, Travel USA, Unusual Interest, USA.

Thousands of rattlesnakes are caught for the Rattlesnake Roundup in Sweetwater, Texas each year. Here,1 of 4 pits. Thousands of rattlesnakes are caught for the Rattlesnake Roundup each year. The arena is divided into sections for wrangling demos, milking, skinning, crafts etc.

Rattlesnake wrangling You can get your picture taken beside a live snake bearing fangs Children watch the snake wranglers

Individuality - each snake has its own unique skin color and pattern Barrel of snakes that have just had heads cut off, ready for skinning Bloody Snake-skinning hand-prints, proudly signed

Individuality Deep-fried rattlesnake - all bones and grease! Miss Roundup and the rattlesnake eating contest

Taxidermy for sale Fang-bearing snake heads in jars for $11 each Crafty key-rings

Rattlesnake Roundup, Sweetwater, Texas March 13 – 15, 2009

From a cultural standpoint, I was quite curious about the Texan Rattlesnake Roundup. Attending, the view was to try to be unbiased and open-minded without any preset opinions. Still, as an animal rights ally I was interested to know whether the four event-filled days were about rattlesnake-appreciation or rattlesnake-loathing. I remain mystified, because it seems to be a mishmash of both.
Driving the three and half hours it takes to get back to Dallas, I marveled how what is acceptable for some, is taboo and unconscionable for others. Since many customs the world over, and across time, are basically borne of societal needs to collectively overcome threats and various natural causes, did this event begin in a similar way?…only here the rituals include a number of large people walking around eating disgusting, deep-fried rattlesnake that was more bone and grease than meat, and corn on the cob? Were the original celebrations of rounding up rattlesnakes actually efforts toward creating a communal mindset of safety, and have they evolved to dominate, even abuse, a predator that was perhaps more of a concern to the earliest settlers than it is now?
For Sweetwater locals, the occasion is an important part of their heritage and present lifestyle that brings the community together, draws in tourists and boosts their economy annually. Scheduled each year are: a parade, carnival grounds, a Miss Rattlesnake Roundup pageant, a Gun, Knife and Coin Show (because coins are obviously in the same category as knives and guns!), a snake-hunting competition, rattlesnake meat-eating contest, and vendors who earn a living selling various rattlesnake parts, products, and bizarre crafts. Unfortunately for raccoons and turtles it was an opportunity to sell their parts as well.
The demise of the rattlesnakes is undeniably sad and seemingly senseless, but the truth of every matter has many dimensions. It is easy to get caught up in the intrigue, and fall under the spell of groups in a festive state, to the point where I did try the deep-fried snake…but after one nip, threw it in the garbage, on top of others’ waste who had done the exact same thing.
I absolutely love reptiles, but admit to have considered buying one of the open-mouthed, fang-baring, stuffed intact, coiled-up snake souvenirs (not the ones sporting tiny cowboy hats and raccoon tails though). Although, upon guilty reflection, is one by-product any less vulgar than the other? I actually thought the coiled up rattlers ready to strike were really pretty, and only wanted one because I’m not likely to see a living one so up close and personal, hopefully.
Whether we agree or disagree, people earn a living doing things we can’t imagine. Practices and beliefs are incorporated over periods of time and passed down through generations. What was once relevant may have lost all sense currently, or in the future. Our consciousness evolves regardless though, and I wonder if in a distorted sort of way, most people leave the fairgrounds of cotton candy and snake pits every year with a deeper appreciation for the uniqueness of all creatures? I certainly did.
Only a human could come up with something so preposterous as little cowboy hats glued to rattler heads. Only a human would buy them! Generally what every pro/anti-whatever-activist-religious-righteous group is seeking is respect. It’s really about respecting all creatures, including humans, who do strange and unpredictable things.

 

Date: October 25th, 2008 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Anoles, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Series, Smile, Summer, Texas.

Green Anole on the propane tankPropane tank made in the USA.
Anole made in the USA. Valve may be imported.

 

Date: September 19th, 2008 | Comments : none | Categories: Animals, Anoles, Autumn, Dallas, Garden, Green, Reptiles, Seasonal, Smile, Summer, Texas.

Green Anole in a Canna Lily leafWe were away for two weeks and forgot to turn the sprinkler system on before leaving, so I thought the Green Anoles might have moved to greener pastures. Fortunately they are still thriving; here one is staying cool and safe inside a large Canna Lily leaf, a leaf that I nearly cut off while clearing out dead and dying plants.

 

Date: August 28th, 2008 | Comments : none | Categories: Aquatic creatures, North Carolina, Reptiles, Seasonal, Summer, Travel, Travel USA, Urban and State Parks, USA, Water.

Feeding turtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NCFeeding bread to about 50 turtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NC

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Feeding turtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NCFeeding turtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NCTurtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NCTurtles, Kitty Hawk, Outer Banks, NC

 

Date: May 13th, 2008 | Comments : none | Categories: Anoles, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Summer, Texas, USA.

Anole, reflection on living room window

 

Date: May 2nd, 2008 | Comments : none | Categories: Anoles, Garden, Reptiles, Seasonal, Texas, USA.

Anole, Lewisville, TXAnole in the garden, pretty much my favorite subject here in Lewisville, TX

 


 

 
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